Upcoming PhD QE Progress

So I’ve been doing my PhD for over two years now, and I haven’t posted a reflective “state of the thesis” post in quite some time, so here it is. I have maxed out my 50 pages (not included ToC and references) for some time now, it’s just been in the process of revision for the last month or so! I have more or less settled on what my research actually is now and am getting a clearer picture of it in my head all the time.

Officially the topic is “Radio Resource Management for Quality of Service in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks”. This is quite the mouthful, I know. Really what it boils down to is: Making various wireless technologies (Bluetooth, WiFi, WiMAX, 3G, 4G, … , etc) seamlessly work together. Many devices are capable of connecting to many of these radio access technologies (RATs), but often it is not seamless. What do I mean by this? Well suppose I am inside a university building, deep in the basement (where they tend to put CS students :P) where there is no mobile reception (3G, 4G etc.). I start downloading a large file, or call someone via wifi. Now I want to walk to my car because it’s time to go home for the day. Many networks now are not able to handle this, and it is interrupted after you change networks. Furthermore, you often have to manually tell the device you want to leave one network and join another. Seamless means this should all happen without you noticing. This is the focus of my research.

The biggest problem that I am concerned with is called handoff or handover. This is when the switch between RATs occurs. Traditionally, this also occurs when a mobile device switches from one tower to another, and it usually involved predicting the motion of the device along with some other factors for Quality of Service (QoS). For a vertical handover, we may or may not need to predict motion. If the heterogeneous wireless network (HWN) is densely covered, many RATs are available throughout the coverage region (as opposed to a sparsely covered where a given location may have access to one technology at once). In a dense HWN, the problem becomes a multi-criteria question.

  1. Which network is most economical for me to connect to?
  2. Which configuration of (network, client) pairs is most profitable for the operator?
  3. Which network is able to provide me with the required QoS?

More technical details to follow…

BWCCA 2010 – Adaptive Mixed Bias Resource Allocation for Wireless Mesh Networks

Today I presented a recent paper on “Adaptive Mixed Bias Resource Allocation for Wireless Mesh Networks” at the BWCCA conference in Fukuoka Japan. The paper is authored by myself and Thabo Nkwe from the University of Guelph. The abstract is below:

Abstract:
In wireless networks, conditions may change rapidly and unpredictably. Often wireless networks are not designed to adapt to these changing conditions and perform poorly when they become congested. The multi-hop broadcast nature of wireless mesh networks amplifies the problem of poor wireless performance. Mixed bias scheduling has previously been applied successfully to wireless mesh networks however, it still suffers from similar problems when conditions change rapidly. In this work we propose an adaptive mixed bias (AMB) algorithm which uses a tabu search approach to change based on delay and dropped packets in the network. The proposed scheduling approach consists of three important algorithms, namely, the tabu search algorithm, move generation, and utility function. The adaptive mixed bias approach is compared against IEEE 802.11 and the non-adaptive mixed bias approach. The performance is evaluated using the packet delivery ratio and average end-to-end delay metrics.

Here are the slides from the talk: BWCCA-NGWMN2010-final (pdf)
and here is the link to the pdf from the conference: Adaptive Mixed Bias Resource Allocation for Wireless Mesh Networks (pfd)

Thesis Defense a Success!

Last Friday I successfully defended my thesis at Guelph. The room was full with lots of friends, students and faculty and everything went fairly smoothly. It definitely feels great to be done after almost two years building up to this. Today I finished the final revisions and submitted all of the copies with an insane amount of paperwork to Grad Program Services. Two to three weeks from now I should get my final bound copy of my thesis and it should soon be available online and in libraries :). For anyone interested in reading it, email me and I can send you a pdf copy.

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PerWin Research Group @ the University of Guelph

Today I completed the listing page for all of the presentations our research group PerWin at the University of Guelph has made in the last year or so. PerWin stands for Pervasive Computing and Wireless Networking Research. The group is directed by my advisor, Dr. Mieso Denko and has several graduate students who are active research members in the group. We have given presentations on topics ranging from Wireless Mesh Networks protocols, Autonomous networks, Fair Scheduling, Load Balancing, RFID, Wireless Security and much more. We have also had special invited talks by several faculty members from various Universities around Ontario (Ryerson, UOIT).

reynolds building, computing department, university of guelph

Reynolds Building @ University of Guelph where PerWin meets regularly

Check out the schedule page here for the list of presentations, presenters and topics. There are also listings of many of the websites for the presenters which may be a good resource for people interested in our work. If you are a faculty member interested in giving a talk contact Dr. Mieso Denko at the University of Guelph.

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Tutorial: Ns-2.33 (and nam) on Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)

Since I have been working with ns2 for the last few months in preparation for my thesis I have decided to write a guide on how to install the most recent version of ns2 on the most recent version of ubuntu (at the time of this writing, Monday June 9th, 2008).

I have found many people already who have had difficulty setting it up so maybe this will be of some help to someone. For this tutorial I am assuming you have installed the most recent version of Ubuntu (8.04). (At the time of writing)

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